Sunday, July 31, 2016

Back to front binding tutorial

Since some of you asked, here's a tutorial on how I do a back to front binding--
that is, using your backing fabric as your binding.  


I got the idea from the Gee's Bend quilts.  
Mine is done a little differently than theirs, 
but it serves the same purpose.
I can hear the Gee's Bend gals saying,
"Why cut off good fabric when you can bring it around to the front?"   



I'll also show you what Gwen Marston taught us about 
making an extra wide binding, 
which is sometimes a good design element.   



If you want an extra wide binding, 
start by cutting your batting bigger than your quilt top.
I do this with scissors, so I don't cut into the backing fabric.
It's OK if the cutting line isn't perfectly straight. 
I made mine 1/2" bigger.

If you don't want the wider binding, 
just cut your batting to the edge of the quilt top. 
Scissors are still a good idea.



Next, cut the backing fabric.
I lined up my ruler with the quilt top edge, rather than the batting edge.
I cut the backing fabric 1-1/2" bigger than the top.



Then fold over and iron the edges on two opposite sides of the quilt.



If you want mitered corners,
 fold the fabric diagonally UP TO THE BATTING EDGE.  
Then fold and iron the other two sides of the quilt.




The corners will fall into place nicely.  Pin if you like.  
Stitch around the edge of the whole quilt by machine or by hand.




Voila!  Here's how it looks on the back.  
After cutting, this binding took less than an hour to complete!

25 comments:

Kim said...

Looks great and sure cuts down on the time it takes to first make a binding then apply it!
thanks for the great tip :0). Happy Sewing

Sujata Shah said...

Nice tutorial LeeAnn! I love the thicker binding as a design element. Indian quilts also never have separate bindings. For some quilts I do like skinny ones but fatter ones make more sense when I compare them to the size of the quilts. Those prints look so yummy in the detailed picture!

Sujata Shah said...

Nice tutorial LeeAnn! I love the thicker binding as a design element. Indian quilts also never have separate bindings. For some quilts I do like skinny ones but fatter ones make more sense when I compare them to the size of the quilts. Those prints look so yummy in the detailed picture!

madhappycrafter said...

Great tutorial - I love doing bindings this way, makes so much more sense to me. Your quilts are so yummy - I love them all.

Quilteuse Forever said...

Great tutorial! I am not really surprised that the Gees Bend quilters end up their quilts that way, it is a simple and logical solution. My first quilts were simply finished like this, then I learned how to make a border with a separate binding!

Karen in Breezy Point said...

Fun idea--I think I will try this on some place mats I need to finish up!

Helen said...

I was taught to make a back to front finish back in the 70's. Glad to know it's still being done. And I really love fat bindings, so I will try Gwennie's method now.

Diane said...

That does add a fun design element. Thanks for showing the steps. I might have to try that just for fun!

Ada Kopitopoulou said...

Much quicker than making a separate binding and sew that one on. I do this also some times.

Mystic Quilter said...

This I have to try! Thanks for passing on this great idea for binding - without waste!!

Rachaeldaisy said...

Thanks for taking the time to share this tutorial. The more options for different design elements gives us more fun to play.

Barb said...

great tutorial. I'll have to give it a try.
I've only done a wide binding once, but I really liked it on that quilt. that buffalo check backing is so funky fun.

Kyle said...

Your tutorial was great. Good inspiration to give it a try.

Marie said...

Voila indeed - thanks so much.

Anonymous said...

Very good tutorial--precise yet brief! I must try this soon. Thanks! Melanie
jimmel37@frontiernet.net

fern said...

Thanks for the great tutorial. My students are always asking for help with binding - your tutorial provides them with more information on binding options!

janie krig said...

Super, thanks for the tutorial and photos, makes it very clear.

Terry said...

Really liked the roof top quilt. And now two ways to sew a back to front binding. Thank you for the tutoorial.

I was fortunate enough to see the Gees Bend quilts a few years back in Reno and to hear Gwen give a delightful talk here in Australia. Your work brings traditionand a personal style together. Hooray

Linda Swanekamp said...

I discovered your blog through a link from Hudson News and Muse. I will follow you as I love your work and explanations!

Cathy Daniel said...

Wonderful to see how it is all done like this! So many gorgeous quilts on your blog - so inspiring! xCathy

Cozy Thyme Cottage said...

My Mom use to do her quilts this way and then when I first started I started doing it that way as never heard of doing bindings! I moved and it seems all my friends do the method of cutting bindings and sewing them on so I got the impression it was wrong to do the fold over of the back. Thank you for this blog as I like to do it that way! Nancy

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Quiltdivajulie said...

Thank you! Great tutorial - I have not done any of mine this way but I WILL give it a try on one of the near-future quilts.

Victoria said...

Super tutorial, LeeAnn, thank you! I've never tried bringing the binding to the front but have been curious. Will definitely have to give it a try with the aid of your simple and clear instructions!

Judy Young said...

Utility quilts were often finished this way. When the quilt is to keep the family warm, quick techniques such as this can speed the process.
The only limitation is that the binding has only one layer. On a heavily, often washed quilt, the binding may wear more quickly.
Judy Young